Win a copy of Amy Sohn’s latest novel Motherland: A Novel

From the synopsis of Amy Sohn’s new book, Motherland: A Novel

It’s just before Labor Day and five mothers and fathers in Cape Cod, Park Slope, and Greenwich Village find themselves adrift professionally and personally.

Need we continue? Quite frankly, they had us at ‘adrift.’

We remember following Amy Sohn’s early career in the 1990’s when she wrote for the NYPress and other publications. From the start, Amy distinguished herself among the young writers born on the cusp of tell-all journalism. Whatever the topic, Amy wrote with a candor about herself and her experiences that was revealing yet not cringe-worthy. She treated her subjects with the same skillful hand.

In Motherland: A Novel Amy examines the lives of five mothers and fathers in transition, in either their marriages or careers. As in all good stories their plotlines cross and, as in all good stories, the heroes and heroines must question everything they once believed to be true — about themselves and their relationships — before the plot is resolved.

Today, we’re thrilled to feature Amy in our Once Upon a Mom series, and to also offer our readers a chance to win a copy of Motherland: A Novel, thanks to the generosity of Simon & Schuster.

To enter for your chance to win a copy of Motherland: A Novel, you must tell us one personal myth or self-deception you were forced to confront, once you became a parent.

This giveaway starts Wednesday, September 26th, 2012 at 9 a.m. and ends at midnight on Tuesday, October 2, 2012. One person who comments by 11:59 p.m. EST on October 2, 2012, will be chosen at random to receive a copy of Motherland: A Novel. Please comment only once.

No purchase necessary. Open to U.S. residents ages 18 years and older. Void where prohibited.

Lisa Duggan

Lisa Duggan is the Founder and CEO of The Modern Village, and publisher of TheParentduJour.com and TheMotherHoodBlog.com.

16 thoughts on “Win a copy of Amy Sohn’s latest novel Motherland: A Novel

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  • September 26, 2012 at 9:05 am
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    I’ll tell you a myth. When my kids were babies, the mother of older kids told me that as the kids got bigger, parenting got harder. I find it just the opposite. The older they get, the easier they are!

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    • September 30, 2012 at 10:12 pm
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      For us too, Margaret. Although the emotional stuff has become more complex. Maybe because I have a girl? Do boys go through the same friendship trials as girls?

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  • September 26, 2012 at 9:05 am
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    What a great question. The biggest illusion for me was that things made sense. That there was logic to parenting. “If my child does this, I will do this.” I had no idea how complex it really is and that what works for one kid, may not – usually doesn’t – work for the other.

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    • September 30, 2012 at 10:08 pm
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      Actually, I think the Murphy’s Mom’s Law states “If my child does this and I do that, it will have the exact opposite effect I desired.”

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  • September 26, 2012 at 10:29 am
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    I quickly learned that you cannot plan out every detail with children. I was so used to being super scheduled, that the first year of being a mother had me crazy. I learned that children and parenting is unpredictable and I had to ease up a bit and learn to go with the flow.

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    • September 30, 2012 at 10:10 pm
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      Very similar to my experience. I was a deadline-driven print production manager before becoming a mom — sticking to the schedule was critical. Alice really gave me a lesson in chaos.

      Reply
  • September 26, 2012 at 10:31 pm
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    kids aren’t all picky eaters. most kids are only picky eaters if you let them be. we’ve encouraged good eating habits and exposed them to a variety of cuisines.

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    • September 27, 2012 at 1:08 pm
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      That sounds like heaven. My daughter is going through her “nothing but bread and cheese” phase now. Thankfully, she’ll eat veggies and fruit, but few other proteins!

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  • September 27, 2012 at 1:10 pm
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    I thought that having a kid would mean that I could read the NYTimes every morning. I cancelled that daily delivery pretty quickly.

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    • September 30, 2012 at 10:05 pm
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      I’m always astounded to find parents who do still manage to read the paper. Any part of it! Alice is nine and I have a pile of unread NYTimes magazines on my desk.

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  • September 29, 2012 at 10:34 pm
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    Thinking that pregnancy was stressful, but once the baby arrived I would be less anxious!

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  • September 29, 2012 at 10:40 pm
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    I really thought I loved babies before having kids. Actually, I love babies that are over age one!!

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    • September 30, 2012 at 10:07 pm
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      I thought I loved all babies — but once I had one, I found I only loved mine. All others I merely tolerated.

      Reply
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